Running in Auckland

15 12 2013

Run on the left side of the sidewalk and the right side of the road.

Give way not yield.

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Stop to smell sunny-side-up flowers.

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careers representing America

18 07 2012

i chased the long tail today.

to research Korean companies with ops in the US and vice versa, i called the Korean Embassy in the US, the Korea Trade Center in Miami and last, visited the US Embassy in Seoul’s site.

is a career in the foreign service right for you?

no no no. i have a path planned out in economic development. i want to work build partnerships, connect students to opportunities, recruit and keep employers in my community. i don’t want to be interested in another career field. dammit, Jim. focus.

yet foreign service sounds fascinating and a lot like economic development.

leeanne nance says econdev is ideal for someone with career ADD, who likes to solve problems, do market research, manage projects, interact with a variety of people for the greater good, create solutions and build relationships. fs is all of this + continual travel.

there are potential downsides too. most important, how do you incorporate a family and children into this life?

but it’s enough right now to note the interest and do more research.
after leaving a job i really, really loved, it’s heartening to be excited about a career again.





Foreigners look alike

10 06 2012

Of all the times we’ve heard Americans can’t tell Asians apart, let me tell you the reverse is true here in Korea. Some Koreans can’t tell foreigners apart.

I first noticed this in Korean class this semester.

In our textbooks, we have characters from around the world that have come here to learn Korean at Sogang. Through episodes from their lives in Korea, we learn the language. For example, American “Andy”, the main protagonist, is in love with “Mina” a beautiful young Korean. This semester, we also met “James” from Canada and “Hans” from Germany.

Every time our teacher posted picture of James or Hans on the board and asked, “Who is this?” the Asian women in class answered:

“Andy!”
“Andy?”
“That’s Andy.”

Andy

for the record

One of our students at the LG corporate camp, Jessica, cannot tell the difference between the foreign teachers. There are only three of us.

I imagine I’m easy to remember as the only woman. But Reid is Canadian, short, stout and brunette, while Brett is Australian, tall, lean and blonde. Still every day Jessica asks:

“Who just taught our Meetings class?”
“Who is our Public Speaking Teacher again, Brett or Reid?”

You’d think the Aussie accent would be a dead giveaway.

I told my mom this story. She told me that when she moved to the States she had the hardest time telling American men apart. And she married one.

ROFL.

other amusing comparisons





Sudafed-less in Seoul

8 04 2012

“I’ll just take the cough drops please,” I told the corner store pharmacist.
If I go to bed early tonight, my immune system will surely kill this cold, I thought.

Well, here we are on Easter Sunday. I still have a cold but no pride and no Sudafed.
Tomorrow, we take mid-terms, and every pharmacy is closed. I can’t even return to the corner store for the pharmacist to watch me eat crow.

So drugs being a non-option, I commenced the quest for chicken soup today.
You know how it is when you’re searching for something specific.

I could not find chicken soup at any restaurant or market it seemed.
Spam soup, yes. Shellfish bouillon, check. Chicken soup, fail.
Maybe the Chinese restaurant will have hot-n-sour soup.
Not on this side of town. Maybe not outside of America.

Being sick in a foreign country sucks.
I had almost reached the pity police, when I passed this store front two minutes from home:

chicken soup restaurant!

Dear God, I know not your methods.

I ordered the 반계탕/ pan gye tang—one half chicken served in its stock with spring onions and two urns of fresh kimchi and baby garlic on the side.

What a comforting meal.

before ordering the requisite rice, flip yo bird.

The soup came with a sake service and house-made ginger tea.
If you are sick in Sinchon, I will take you to 장수보감 / chang soo boh kam, which serves only chicken soup.

In the meantime, am I supposed to learn something from today?
Have faith;
Be patient;
Ask for help;
Check arrogance at the airport?





peripatetic

30 04 2010

word of the day:
a : of, relating to, or given to walking b : moving or traveling from place to place : itinerant